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Noticeboard

The NHS in Ashford and Public Health England (PHE) are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

The risk to the general public is high. If you have a temperature and/or a new dry cough and/or have been in direct contact with a confirmed case of coronavirus:

DO NOT PRESENT AT THE SURGERY/PHARMACY/A&E instead go to https://111.nhs.uk/service/covid-19 

Only call 111 if you cannot manage your symptoms at home

Click the below link for the most up to date isolation rules

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance

High Risk Groups for Contracting Coronavirus

Patients may have received a letter identifying them as being at high risk of contracting Coronavirus.  Please see below a list of problems which identifies patients as being in this high risk group:

  • People with a solid organ transplant such as a kidney or liver transplant
  • People with specific cancers
  • People with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy or radical radiotherapy for lung cancer
  • People with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
  • People having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
  • People having other targeted cancer treatments which can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors.
  • People who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months, or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs.
  • People with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe COPD. See below.
  • People with rare diseases and inborn errors of metabolism that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as SCID, homozygous sickle cell)
  • People on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection
  • People who are pregnant with significant congenital heart disease
  • All patients on the following medications: Azathioprine, Mycophenolate (both types), Cyclosporine, Sirolimus, Tacrolimus.
  • Patients with diabetes with HbA1c greater than 75, recent diabetic ketoacidosis or poor medication adherence;
  • Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) who have required hospitalisation in the last 12 months or patients who have required 2 or more courses of steroids and/or antibiotics in the last 12 months;
  • Patients with asthma with a history of hospitalisation in the last 12 months or ever been admitted to intensive care;
  • Patients with significant heart failure which has required hospitalisation for their heart failure within the last 12 months;
  • Patients with multiple long-term conditions;
  • Patients who have had a splenectomy;
  • Patients taking continuous oral corticosteroids of the equivalent of 20 mg of prednisolone or more for over 4 weeks;
  • Patients taking immunosuppressive or immunomodulating medication such as cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, leflunomide, methotrexate, mycophenolate. It is expected that patients taking these medications will be under a shared-care protocol with hospital specialist colleagues and a risk stratification approach should be taken. Advice can be sought from the relevant specialist. Guidance is available from the British Society of Rheumatology https://www.rheumatology.org.uk/news-policy/details/Covid19-Coronavirus-update-members
  • Other patients that the general practitioner considers would be at high risk such as patients with severe dementia, cognitive impairment.  
  •  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

 

 



 
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